The F1 Drivers with the Most Fake Followers

The F1 Drivers with the Most Fake Followers

Posted 09 July, 2019 at 14:50

Author Mark Bradshaw on behalf of (IFM) Independent Forecourt Magazine


  • Daniil Kvyat, of team Toro Rosso, is the driver with the most fake followers – 62.5% of his 166,000 aren’t genuine.
  • Lewis Hamilton, Grand Prix leader, boasts a more modest 34.3% fake follower count, of his 5.54million followers – he places in seventh worst for numbers of fake followers.
  • Of his 71,200 Twitter followers, British competitor George Russell, has a much smaller fake followers count at 24.6%.
  • The driver with the smallest percentage of fake followers is Alexander Albon – only 23.3% of his 31,900 followers are spam/bots.

In November 2018, Instagram cracked down on celebrities and influencers with ingenuine followers. This ‘purge’ reduced significant numbers of fake, inactive, spam, bots, or as often discovered - bought followers.

Why buy followers? Users may do so to appear more influential, to harness more media and therefore commercial attention, amongst others. But Instagram isn’t the only social platform faced with this issue.

Twitter has battled the problem of bots and spam accounts for many years. And with the British Grand Prix fast approaching (12-14 July), private number plates company Click4reg.co.uk wanted to discover how many followers of the 20 competing F1 drivers* are fake.

Using SparkToro’s Fake Followers Audit Tool, the Twitter handle of each driver was inserted to calculate the average percentage of fake followers*.

Which drivers have the most fake followers?

This is probably one of the only pole positions a driver wouldn’t want.

With the highest percentage of spam/bot accounts following them, Daniil Kvyat, of team Toro Rosso, finds himself in the top spot – 62.5% of his 166,000 followers are not genuine. This potentially cuts his authentic following from (approximately) 166,000 to just 62,000.

Kevin Magnussen, of team Haas, has the next highest number of fake followers – of his 470,000 followers, 53.3% are fake.

The drivers which make up the remaining top 10 include:

Robert Kubica (48.6%), Sergio Pérez (40.5%), Romain Grosjean (40.2%), Nico Hülkenberg (35.8%), Lewis Hamilton (34.3%), Daniel Ricciardo (33.1%), Carlos Sainz (32.9%) and Max Verstappen (32.1%).

Britain’s homegrown star, Lewis Hamilton, is one of the most successful Formula 1 drivers to date. But not only pole position on the track, he also boasts the most followers on Twitter at 5.54million. And yet, a shocking 34.3% of his followers in fact are not genuine. This places him in the worst 10 F1 drivers.

Which drivers have the least fake followers?

With the smallest percentage of ingenuine twitter followers, Alexander Albon is the most genuine driver in this study – only 23.3% of his 31,900 followers are fake.

In second place, with 24.6% of fake followers, is British driver George Russell.

And in increasing percentages, the remaining and next best drivers for fake followers include:

Lando Norris (25.8%), Antonio Giovinazzi (27%), Lance Stroll (27.7%), Charles Leclerc (28.4%), Pierre Gasly (30%) and finally Valtteri Bottas (31.3%).

Fellow Brit George Russell scores significantly better than leader Lewis Hamilton, with a fake follower percentage of 24.6% - he places as the second best in this study.

*This study aimed to include all 20 drivers competing in Formula 1, however Kimi Räikkönen and Sebastian Vettel do not own personal Twitter accounts and so have been excluded.

*Live audits conducted on 05/07/19

*According to the tool used, ‘fake followers’ are defined as accounts that are unreachable and will not see the account’s tweets (either because they’re spam, bots, propaganda etc. or because they’re no longer active on Twitter).

*Fake Follower Audit methodology: each audit analyses a sample of 2,000 random accounts that follow {insert Twitter handle}, then looks at 25+ factors correlated with spam/bot/low quality accounts. None of these, alone, indicate a spam/bot/low quality account; but, when many factors are present, there’s a strong correlation with low quality. Factors like Display Name, Tweet Language and Over Sharing, for example. 

If Credit https://www.click4reg.co.uk.

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